In this graduate diploma level music course, you’ll be provided with forward thinking, industry relevant musical knowledge and skills across multiple genres, with a strong technology, cross media, collaborative and interdisciplinary focus.

Designed to give you a high degree of advanced musical knowledge and skills, this course will enable you gain a comprehensive, insightful and scholarly understanding of your specific area of musical practice.

Become an artistic leader through your practice, capable of solving complex artistic music issues and problems, in industry relevant contexts. Gain the knowledge and skills that will fully prepare you for employment opportunities in a wide range of music and related fields.

By choosing this course as your preferred study pathway, you’ll be creating additional avenues to further study in master’s level qualifications.

Course admission profile




Course Code GDMCP
CRICOS Code 085847E
Study Areas Music
Study Level Graduate Diploma
Course Type Graduate Diploma
Campuses Box Hill Campus​​

Tuition Fee Type Estimated Annual Fee
International Fee $20,280.00
Service Fees Estimated Annual Fees
Service & Amenities* $155.00
Core Skills Support** $75.00
Annual Material Fees No materials fee applies
Retain Course Items*** No fee applies


* Does not apply to VETiS or Short course students.

** Does not apply to VETiS, International students, Short Courses, Graduate Degrees , or re-enrolling students who re-enrol in the same course.

***Retained Course Items are purchased by the student once prior to commencing. The course items bought by the student become the property of the student. Such items retain a generic application for other purposes outside the student's course of study (e.g. textbooks).

The student tuition & material fees as published are subject to change given individual circumstances at enrolment. Fees listed are for 2019 and may increase annually over the duration of delivery. Advertised start dates and delivery locations are subject to viable student numbers. For more information please contact our Course Advisors on 1300 BOX HILL.

A minimum IELTS overall score of 6.5 (Academic) with no band less than 6.0. A minimum TOEFL score of 575 for paper examination;232 for computer based and 90 for Internet based. 

For other accepted tests, please visit the English Language Requirements page.

February

Full time: 12 months (classes take place on weekdays)

The mode of delivery is mainly face to face and some occasional online learning.

Classes take place on weekdays - usually Tuesdays and Thursdays.  Each year half the classes are taught as evening classes, meaning that a part time student could do the entire course in the evenings over two years.

Box Hill

You must have:

  • an Australian undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in a related discipline, or
  • an Australian Diploma or Advanced Diploma in Music (or equivalent) and 2 years of relevant professional experience, or
  • extensive (at least 6 years) of relevant and professional industry experience.

You will be required to demonstrate competence in the English language prior to admission.

 

PRE-TRAINING REVIEW

To assist prospective students to determine whether a course is suitable and appropriate for the individual needs the Institute and CAE will assess all students’ language, literacy and numeracy and digital literacy by asking you to undertake a self-assessment review prior to the enrolment.

A course advisor will discuss the outcomes of the review and make recommendations about whether the course is suitable for you, and identify additional support where required.

Successful completion will enable you to apply for further studies, particularly in the fields of:

  • performance
  • musicology
  • music therapy
  • music education

You can apply for doctoral study in the core areas of your music specialisation, namely in performance, composition, audio production, music technologies, music theory, history and analysis.

You can also choose to apply to study a Masters of Music (Contemporary Practice) at Box Hill Institute.

Direct entry. See how to apply or contact the international office.

As part of the entry proceedure, an interview with the Course Coordinator will be required.  This can be via Skype or other communications media.  In the interview, the structure of the courses will be discussed, and the student will be asked how they feel their background and experiences would mesh with the content of the courses.  Any work the candidate brings in to demonstrate their competency and areas of interest will be listened to and evaluated sympathetically.  Since this course depends on each student developing their own unique interests and abilities, a common advanced standard for admission (apart from basic competencies) is not really possible to specify, but in consultation with the course coordinator, any gaps in the student's preparation will be identified, and remedial activities suggested.

This course is accredited by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) and the qualification is aligned with the Australian Qualification Framework (AQF) level 8 and Box Hill Institute Graduate Attributes.

The course aims to produce musicians who are equally at home in the worlds of composition, improvisation, performance, and production; have a fluid understanding of the world of contemporary critical theory as it applies to music and other art-forms, and who can both interact with practitioners in other art-forms, as well as exploring those art-forms themselves.

This course takes place in the Nelson Campus, at the corner of Nelson and Whitehorse Roads in Box Hill, in our new state-of-the-art music facility.

After successful completion, you may wish to apply for various employment opportunities in a wide range of music and related fields such as:

  • live performance
  • song writing
  • music theatre
  • audio recording
  • post production
  • composition for film, television, corporate video, animation and game audio
  • music publishing
  • music retail
  • music education (i.e. studio teaching)
  • advertising

Completion of 48 credit points.  First year contains 6 subjects plus 2 electives.

We expect to enrol between 3 and 20 students.

Code

Title

Points

MUS511 APPLIED ADVANCED MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 6.0

In this subject you undertake an in-depth exploration of the use of technology for music creation. It introduces a range of the tools, programming languages, software environments, and working processes for creating music with technology. All students will gain knowledge and skills across real-time interactive performance systems, electro-acoustic music, acousmatic music (purely electronic) , and or sonic environments for design and media production.
This subject is conducted as an artist's studio workshop, including discussion of material, individual studio work on specific music projects, as well as presentations and critiques.
Principles and practices are explored and documented as a part of the project assessment.
Works-in-progress on the projects are submitted for evaluation twice during the semester, with finished work expected by semester's end.

Contact hours are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks.

Prerequisites: Nil
Assessment: Assessment 1: Prepare and present a musical work that integrates your musical abilities with the concepts of the computer as a musical medium. This should demonstrate exploration in a previously unknown creative territory. Due Week 4, worth 30%
Assessment 2: Prepare and present a musical work that integrates your musical abilities with the concepts of the computer as a musical instrument. This might include a live performance. Due Week 8, worth 30%
Assessment 3: Prepare and present a musical work that integrates your musical abilities with the concepts of the computer as a musical partner. This should demonstrate how the computer is actively assisting you in your creative output. Worth 40%.

MUS522 PERFORMANCE STUDIES 6.0

This subject is designed as an introduction to performance as a larger cultural concept. Class projects include 1) detailed analysis of an instance of contemporary performance, and 2) designing and implementing an experiment in performance, including short critical commentary. Multiple approaches and systems for music analysis are explored. Emphasis is on detailed methods for describing musical structures and for organising and scoring sound.
Performance whether in the arts, in the public sphere, in personal life or in collective ritual has been the nexus of public meaning-making through the history of humankind. The act of performance as a primary human activity pre-dates writing, and many of our cultural artefacts are the traces of performances past. Increasingly, performance is enacted fully in the digital domain in contemporary life while retaining full individual and collective significance. To understand and employ a knowledge of the larger significance of performance opens up creative ideas and insights into one's own artistic practice.

Contact hours are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks.

Prerequisites: Nil
Assessment: Assessment 1: Detailed analysis of an instance of contemporary performance - description, analysis and contextualisation - Oral Presentation (15 minutes) with written paper (1000 words). Due Week 5. Worth 30%

Assessment 2: Preliminary analysis project, focussed on the themes, concepts and application of skills that will be explored (in a practical sense) in the Performance Experiment in week 12 (1000 words). Due Week 7, Worth 10%

Assessment 3: Design and implement a Performance Experiment (30 minutes), including short written critical commentary (1000 words) contextualising the ideas explored in relation to the themes and theories introduced in the classes and literature and reflection on what was learned from the process. Due Week 12. Worth 60%

MUS521 MIXED MEDIA DESIGN 6.0

This subject investigates the fertile ground of combined art forms and new media. Particularly, where sound and music are not in the 'accompanying' role, but rather as a part of a synergistic whole. This way of working can be traced back (in the Western art world) to the colours and music of Scriabin, the Varese, Xenakis, Le Corbusier sound and architecture collaborations in the 1950s, and the hyper-theatrical compositions of Wagner and Stockhausen, among others. A select grouping of prominent artists and their use of new media will be explored. Examples may be drawn from: drama, opera, 3D immersive environments, soundscapes and museum exhibition, environmental interaction, installation, projection, and the work of visual artists, acoustic engineers, composers, programmers, and animators.
Some examples include but are not limited to: Bill Viola's immersive video art installations; Innovations in pop music and spectacle production; Lynette Wallworth's expanded cinema and environmental installations; Stelarc's robotic and body mechanical performances. This coursework includes analytical investigations, followed by the preparation of the design for an original creative intermedia mixed media work.

Contact hours are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks.

Prerequisites: Nil
Assessment: Assessment 1: Analysis of a current large scale media work - oral presentation, with written documentation (10 minutes, 1000 words). Due Week 6 Worth 40%

Assessment 2: Create a plan, design, mockup, storyboard for an original intermedia, mixed media project. (2000 words equivalent). Due Week 12. Worth 40%.

Assessment 3: Evaluation of major work and intermedia artists to inform the intermedia project (1000 words). Due Week 12. Worth 20%

MUS512 MUSIC COLLABORATIONS 1 6.0

This workshop explores the great potential for developing musical ideas in collaboration with other performers. Whether you consider yourself a performer, a composer, a music technologist, a sound designer or media artist - participants are expected to compose, perform and collaborate to generate new musical ideas. As an ensemble for exploring and testing original musical ideas, participants work in duets, trios, or larger groups. Innovative means of collaboration are encouraged; the aim is to provide musicians the opportunity to workshop intensively with other performers. Participants meet at least once per week for 3 hours duration in faculty-led groupings. The point is to expand one's way of making music through this working process. Constant documentation and reflection on the process is encouraged.

Contact hours are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks.
Prerequisites: Nil
Assessment: Assessment 1: Performance Document 1 including audio/video recording, individual annotations, scores and commentary (1000 words equivalent). Due Week 6. Worth 20%
Assessment 2: Practice journal/workbook demonstrating personal musical development throughout semester (1000 words equivalent). Due Week 10. Worth 20%
Assessment 3: Performance Document 2 including audio/video recording, individual annotations, scores and commentary (2000 words equivalent documentation - indicative load). Due Week 12. Worth 20%
Assessment 4: Exam period: Public Performance based on Performance Document 2 (10 minutes performance). During Exam period. Worth 40%

MUS513 RESEARCH METHODS 6.0

This subject introduces you to academic research practice and explores interpretative, conceptual and methodological issues, which emerge in relation to specific research processes. It seeks to address and encourage a reflective approach to various research methodologies and techniques appropriate to postgraduate study, relevant to the music industry and applicable to music practice and music business. It will equip you with knowledge and skill necessary for successful completion of further research subjects for the Graduate Diploma or Masters qualification in the relevant field, and for subsequent creative or entrepreneurial endeavour in music or music business.

Contact hours are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks.
Prerequisites: Nil
Assessment: Assessment 1: Research activity via Facebook: Students critically review a relevant journal article and other student analyses in relation to relevant themes and criteria. This will take the form of individual and group interactive activities using an online forum format. Students are to demonstrate constructive critical analysis skills and knowledge of relevant theory and practice. Length: 150 words per review - Students review journal article by Sunday 11.55pm, and other student analyses by Wednesday 11.55pm of that same week. Due: Progressively each week in the semester. Worth 30%

Assessment 2: Annotated Bibliography: Students identify a research topic and literature they consider relevant to this topic by using a research information planner template, which guides the research process and prompts identification of search concepts and strategies, and information sources and material types. Students produce an annotated bibliography using this method that provides a brief account of this available research literature on that topic. Due Week 6. Length: 1500 words. Worth 30%

Assessment 3: Essay: Students identify literature they consider relevant to their topic, and critically review the research methods and analyses. The student reflects on research assumptions and impact on validity of conclusions, identifies weaknesses in terms of research questions and methods, used to apply to resolve those questions. Due Week 12. Length: 2000 words. Worth 40%.

MUS523 RESEARCH PROPOSAL 6.0

This subject builds on MUS 513 Research Methods and offers students further skills to develop a scholarly approach to music based research, as they approach a research question that has practical implications for music related study. Students conduct a critical literature review, and subsequently present a research proposal for a larger project, which includes an annotated bibliography. Students are expected to identify and address any ethical risks of their research.

Contact hours are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks.
Prerequisites: Mus513 Research Methods
Assessment: Assessment Task 1: Literature Review: The student selects a topic, which forms the basis of a research proposal. They undertake and write a comprehensive critical review of the literature that addresses previous research in the relevant field with a view to clarifying a specific research question for their later research. Length: 1500 words. Due Week 6. Worth 30%

Assessment Task 2: Research proposal (1): Select a relevant topic and write a critical and reflective discussion and justification of a research question, proposed methodologies, context, and rationale for the research proposal that includes any relevant ethical considerations and frameworks. Length: 2000 words and oral presentation. Due Week 9. Worth 30%

Assessment Task 3: Research proposal (2): Submit a revised research proposal addressing issues identified in feedback to Research proposal (1). Length: 2000 words. Due Week 12. Worth 40%

MUS532 CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITION STUDIES 6.0

Contemporary Composition Studies will advance students' ability to analyse, evaluate, compose and or arrange music in a contemporary setting. By the very nature of the subject, these settings will be varied, but could include: film scoring, gaming, popular song writing, contemporary 'classical' writing, electronic composition, writing for mixed ensemble and writing for traditional large ensemble.
This subject builds on assumed theoretical knowledge and takes a more practical approach to learning compositional and scoring techniques. Students will study compositional techniques employed by various composers, and apply their knowledge in scoring a series of short filmic excerpts.

Contact hours are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks.
Prerequisites: Nil
Assessment: Assessment 1: Analysis of compositions assignment, essay equivalent of 1500 words. Due Week 5, Worth 30%

Assessment 2: Submission of composition folio: drafts, equivalent to 1500 words. Due Week 8, Worth 30%

Assessment 3: Submission of composition folio: final - and analysis, equivalent to 2000 words. Due Week 12, Worth 40%

MUS533 REHEARSAL METHODS AND TECHNIQUES 6.0

Rehearsal Techniques and Methods will advance students’ ability to effectively prepare and rehearse an ensemble for performances in a contemporary setting. By the very nature of the subject, these settings will be varied, but could include small chamber ensembles, mid-size ensembles and large ensembles across a diverse spread of genres. Both instrumental and vocal rehearsal practices will be examined.

Students will critically analyse compositions and musical scores to discover techniques and devices pertinent to their personal objectives. It will advance their ability to analyse, evaluate, problem-solve and present contemporary music. This subject builds on assumed theoretical knowledge and takes a more practical approach to learning rehearsal and preparation techniques.

Prerequisites:
Assessment:

MUS531 ADVANCED IMPROVISATION 6.0

This unit examines the ways that improvisation is understood and practiced in a range of performance and compositional settings. Detailed analysis will inform students in processes and techniques, and help to define what improvisation in a contemporary setting means to the individual. Practical application of models, tools and devices will enable students to experience, analyse and reflect on the theoretical in action extending their own practice. Ideas covered in the course include, but are not limited to: Actualising an idea into a musical performance; Analysing styles, process, creativity and musicality;
Contemporary improvisation in experimental and extraordinary mediums; Cultural diversity and interaction with contemporary music; Historical and current analysis of improvisation; Free jazz and improvisation genres; Electro-acoustic improvisation and music generation processes; Provocative and progressive thoughts challenging traditional notions of performance.

Technical and performance facility on an instrument or voice equivalent to a completed undergraduate level is required to study this subject.

Contemporary improvisation in experimental and extraordinary mediums; Cultural diversity and interaction with contemporary music; Historical and current analysis of improvisation; Free jazz and improvisation genres; Electro-acoustic improvisation and music generation processes; Provocative and progressive thoughts challenging traditional notions of performance.

Technical and performance facility on an instrument or voice equivalent to a completed undergraduate level is required to study this subject.

Contact hours are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks.
Prerequisites: Nil
Assessment: Assessment 1: Position paper, with evidence of research and detailed understanding of contemporary trends. Equivalent to 1000 words. Due Week 6. Worth 20%
Assessment 2: Analysis and performance project where the student devises their own performance strategies and then analyses the process and outcomes under the supervision of the teacher and their relationship with topics and issues raised in the class. Equivalent to 2000 words. Due Week 10. Worth 40%
Assessment 3: Final performance, demonstrating repertoire research, specific improvisational techniques and practices and devices. 20 minutes. Due Week 12. Worth 40%

MBM113 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC INDUSTRY ISSUES 1 6.0

This subject offers an integrated analysis of the concepts, theories, viewpoints, practices and strategies that shape the contemporary music industry. Students analyse the latest developments in the industry, and evaluate the scope and implications of significant challenges. This subject considers local and international causes and influences, and consequent micro and macro environmental effects. Students evaluate the environmental influences and factors (social, technological, legal, economic, and cultural) on current issues, and the specific effects on the music and entertainment industries in order to develop their understanding of causes and influences, key questions, and the developmental direction of the music industry.

Indicative student workload is 10 hours per week for 12 weeks.
Prerequisites: None
Assessment: Assessment 1. Short Critical Review, length 1,000 words, 20%
Assessment 2. Essay, length 2,000 words, 40%
Assessment 3. Case studies, 2,000 words, 40%

MBM211 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC INDUSTRY ISSUES 2 6.0

This subject is the second of two subjects, in which students review and evaluate the concepts, theories, viewpoints, practices and strategies that shape the contemporary music industry. Students investigate, analyse and synthesise information relating to the latest developments in the music industry. Students evaluate the scope and implications of contemporary music industry issues in the context of the concepts and theories that are studied in the first year of the course including creative entrepreneurial endeavour. Students appraise local and international trends and consequent micro and macro environmental effects—social, technological, legal, economic and cultural factors—that influence issues which currently confront the industry.

Indicative student workload is 10 hours per week for 12 weeks.
Prerequisites: Yes, MBM113
Assessment: Assessment 1: Reviews via Social Media, 12 reviews of 150 words each, 30%
Assessment 2: Essay on emerging global trends, length 1500 words, 30%
Assessment 3: Article for print or online media, length 2,000 words, 40%.


Last updated: December 6, 2018 01:14pm